Tagged: politics

On Clickbait, Logical Fallacies, New Presidents, and Male-Pattern Baldness

The blog awakens. The cool thing about having a blog that brings in zero income is that there is total freedom to stop writing in it any time you want. My absence from the blogosphere over the last year+ can be explained by a two main elements: my 2014 free time being directed toward the search for a new ministry, and the fact that I just really…didn’t care to write. But it’s 2015, and you know what THAT means…

2016 is coming.

Ever since the SCOTUS ruling on gay marriage and the troubling news regarding Planned Parenthood, my Facebook feed has returned back to what it once was: a clickbait-infested ticker dripping with logical fallacies that remind me why I’m losing my hair at 31. Continue reading

On Rights for Rights and Lefts

It’s been a little while since I’ve written a blog post. It’s not for lack of material – indeed, I’ve had plenty of observations over the last several weeks that could manafest an interesting blog post – but due to busyness and the fear of being inaccurately labeled as a ranting liberal (who knew gun control was such a hot issue?), I’ve chosen to dial it back a bit. But here we are, and here is the simple truth: I’ve read something in the Bible and want to share it with you. Whether it is considered to be conservative or liberal in nature, I could not care less. I would hope it is neither.

I serve as youth pastor at a church where the senior pastor is cool enough to call me “Associate Pastor” rather than just the “youth guy.” He even lets me preach from time to time with a “whenever you want, just let me know” sort of attitude, and I really appreciate that kind of ministerial validation. When the opportunity came for me to take on a four-week preaching binge, I gladly accepted and planned a four-week series on the book of Philippians. In reality, one could exegetically take months preaching from this epistle, but I’m happy to at least do a brief survey over it. Continue reading

Let’s Talk About Welfare (and be cool about it)

It saddens me that I have seen multiple forms of this message posted on the social networks by my Christ-following friends. Does this communicate a heart for the hurting?

I have my own opinions about welfare. I also have a few thoughts about immigration. But I’ll do my best to keep them to myself for now. What I want to talk about today is not the actual subjects of welfare and immigration, but the general tone and attitude a follower of Christ ought to have when discussing the issues around helping those in need.

To be honest, I intended to write about something completely different today (prenatal behavior as a sign that we are actually made in the image of God). But this morning, I happened to read Jesus’ “Olivet Discourse” from Matthew chapters 24-25 and suddenly had flashes of CNN and Fox News making my quiet time not so quiet (plus, there was a little bit of Jon Stewart in there as well). Continue reading

On Gun & God Control

Like everyone else, I’d like some answers. I’ve looked to CNN for clarity. I’ve even turned on Fox News. MSNBC. Blogs. Newspapers (online, of course). Nobody has quick answers for me. But as I read in Matthew 14, the thing to do in times of sorrow, disappointment, and confusion, is to unload it onto Jesus. Even Jesus himself went to pray in solitude when he was troubled. If you spend even more time in Matthew 14, you’ll also read that when we become too focused on ourselves – our circumstances, insecurities, concerns – we begin to sink. When we feel lost, sunk, or in the process of becoming either of the two, the only logical thing to do is turn our eyes upon Jesus.

And yet too many of us are focusing on our “rights.” Some folks are suggesting that the President, along with gun control advocates, is “politicizing tragedy.” It’s ironic to me that these are the same folks who have taken this tragedy as an opportunity to politicize their faith – folks like Mike Huckabee who suggest that God abandoned the children at Sandy Hook because we’ve “systematically removed God” from schools and government. I agree with Huckabee when he says, “Maybe we ought to let him in on the front end and we wouldn’t have to call him to show up when it’s all said and done at the back end,” but I would suggest that this politician is woefully misguided as to where the “front end” is located. Continue reading