Tagged: Christian response

What I’ve Learned From Being Burglarized

Life’s events have a way of showing us where improvement is needed. Like a stress test, we’re often put into situations where our limits are tested, and in the end we are able to determine our own stability, breaking points, and vulnerability. Sort of like how my house was put to the test against burglars this last Labor Day afternoon.

My wife and I took the kids and one of our dogs (the one that doesn’t get car sick) out to the park for a two-hour outing, only to come home and find that people had been inside our home. Those of you who have had this experience know the feelings of fear, violation, anger, and confusion that come with finding out you’ve been burglarized. Luckily, most of what they took can be replaced. But the pictures from the recent birth of my son cannot. To say the least, a home burglary is quite the stress test on a person who wants to keep his family safe and secure, and I think I’ve found the points of vulnerability in both my house and my character as a result. Continue reading

U Mad Bro? (Coming to grips with an angry God)

u-mad-broI tried to avoid adding to the rat’s nest of articles and opinions surrounding the VMA performance of Miley Cyrus  and Robin Thicke, but my reading today in Romans brought the issue to the forefront of my mind. I’m not going to comment on the level of morality in the VMA performance, nor will I make any psychologically unfounded guesses as to the cause or reasoning behind the behavior. As I’ve said in a previous post, I’m not too keen on making judgements about someone I haven’t had a conversation with. What I’m more interested in is how Christians react to sin in other people. More specifically, why is it that so many folks who engage in everyday run-of-the-mill sins feel so free to make judgements on the morality of someone on a TV screen? Yes, we ought to find sin offensive if we are going to presume to follow a God who finds sin offensive. But lately, a lot of cyber-stones being thrown by folks who seem to have forgotten that we’re all guilty of something.

Maybe, even on a subconscious level, some of us feel that just because we didn’t personally get on stage and permanently ruin teddy bears for everyone, that God has given us a free pass on our less-noticed, more socially accepted sins. So today, let’s look at the mirror instead of the TV. Continue reading

Let’s Talk About Welfare (and be cool about it)

It saddens me that I have seen multiple forms of this message posted on the social networks by my Christ-following friends. Does this communicate a heart for the hurting?

I have my own opinions about welfare. I also have a few thoughts about immigration. But I’ll do my best to keep them to myself for now. What I want to talk about today is not the actual subjects of welfare and immigration, but the general tone and attitude a follower of Christ ought to have when discussing the issues around helping those in need.

To be honest, I intended to write about something completely different today (prenatal behavior as a sign that we are actually made in the image of God). But this morning, I happened to read Jesus’ “Olivet Discourse” from Matthew chapters 24-25 and suddenly had flashes of CNN and Fox News making my quiet time not so quiet (plus, there was a little bit of Jon Stewart in there as well). Continue reading

On Gun & God Control

Like everyone else, I’d like some answers. I’ve looked to CNN for clarity. I’ve even turned on Fox News. MSNBC. Blogs. Newspapers (online, of course). Nobody has quick answers for me. But as I read in Matthew 14, the thing to do in times of sorrow, disappointment, and confusion, is to unload it onto Jesus. Even Jesus himself went to pray in solitude when he was troubled. If you spend even more time in Matthew 14, you’ll also read that when we become too focused on ourselves – our circumstances, insecurities, concerns – we begin to sink. When we feel lost, sunk, or in the process of becoming either of the two, the only logical thing to do is turn our eyes upon Jesus.

And yet too many of us are focusing on our “rights.” Some folks are suggesting that the President, along with gun control advocates, is “politicizing tragedy.” It’s ironic to me that these are the same folks who have taken this tragedy as an opportunity to politicize their faith – folks like Mike Huckabee who suggest that God abandoned the children at Sandy Hook because we’ve “systematically removed God” from schools and government. I agree with Huckabee when he says, “Maybe we ought to let him in on the front end and we wouldn’t have to call him to show up when it’s all said and done at the back end,” but I would suggest that this politician is woefully misguided as to where the “front end” is located. Continue reading

My Take on “The War on Christmas”

oreilly-war-on-christmasI’ve been reading a lot of articles, blog posts, tweets, and status updates regarding the traditional “war on Christmas.” What was once a time to show the world a story of hope and peace has now become a point of contention between Christians and, well, everyone else.

I’d like to go on the record and officially separate myself with the school of thought behind Alice Stewart’s article, The War On Christmas Continues, Charlie Brown found on (you guessed it) the Fox News website. In her article, she (in a way that shows no love for the lost) suggests that atheists go look into thin air and “leave our Christmas traditions alone.” I’m afraid that this kind of thinking has gotten too popular among Christians today. It’s reckless and damaging. It alienates non-Christians. It is counter-productive to the big picture. Continue reading

Why Do The Christians Hate Bob Costas?

I don’t watch NFL. The sound of a football game on TV brings back memories of Sunday afternoons where my dad wouldn’t let anything be on the TV that didn’t involve the Broncos (don’t get the wrong idea here – I have fond memories of hanging out with my Dad…I just didn’t share his fondness of boring TV when I was growing up under his roof). In fact, the only reason I know anything about Bob Costas is because he’s the nice man who appears on my TV screen every two years when the Olympics are on (you know – real sports). I am so far-removed from the NFL that I wasn’t even aware that Mr. Costas did anything other than cover the Olympics. So you can imagine my surprise when I started seeing hateful comments about Bob Costas appearing on my Facebook newsfeed after the December 2nd Sunday Night Football presentation on NBC. To put it lightly, Costas said some things during halftime that indirectly addressed the issue of gun control, which upset some people. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, see it here.

Maybe it’s because I live in Kansas City, where people are already pretty grumpy about the local NFL “situation,” but Continue reading